Autoimmune Reaction Hypothesis - Part 2 | Autoimmune Liver Failure

Boettler et al published an article in the Journal of Hepatology on April 21, 2022 which is strong agreement with the Autoimmune Reaction Hypothesis.

Autoimmune Reaction Hypothesis - Part 2 | Autoimmune Liver Failure

Autoimmune Reaction Hypothesis Recap

On February 26, 2022, I published the first part in a series entitle The Problem with Gene-based Injections.

First Principles | The Problem with Gene-based Injections - Part 1
Since the beginning of vaccine rollout, many people looked at me quizzically when informed that I had no intention of getting an injection of an experimental gene-therapy.

The hypothetical mechanism of damage that the gene-based injections pose to humans was presented as follows:

  1. Spike-protein encoding genes are wrapped in lipid nanoparticles (LNP)
  2. LNPs are injected into a human
  3. LNPs enter the bloodstream
  4. Bloodstream spreads LNPs throughout the body
  5. Cells fuse with LNP & make the Spike protein - the antigen
  6. Cells then present the antigen via MHC ITrain killer T-cells
  7. Killer T-cells circulate around the body and destroy any cell that is presenting the Spike protein antigen

This is the critical final step:

  • Before your cells fused with LNPs, they were healthy
  • After vaccination, killer T-cells now perceive those healthy cells as infected - requiring destruction

This is the definition of an autoimmune response - the host immune system turns on its own healthy cells.


Previously on Autoimmune Reaction Hypothesis

In late March, I published the following article regarding a piece in the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology in which the very same hypothesis I posed above was outlined:

Autoimmune Reaction Hypothesis | Academia Catches Up
On February 26, 2022, I published the first part in a series entitle The Problem with Gene-based Injections.

If you haven't had a chance to read that one, I would highly recommend it. I barely do any talking, as the article speaks for itself!

Fast-forward to Today

Boettler et al published an article in the Journal of Hepatology on April 21, 2022.

In this case study, the authors identified immune correlates in a patient who suffered from autoimmune hepatitis shortly after the first and second (more severe) dose of an mRNA vaccination.

Thankfully for the patient, an intensive course of steroids helped to bring the inflammation down...at least acutely. But, the authors do describe rather interesting findings that are in strong agreement with the concerns I posed in The Problem with Gene-Based Injections series.

The first thing they identified was the overall immune-cell landscape in the liver (as well as bloodstream). As predicted, T cells were elevated.

Even more telling, the very cells I was concerned about (CD8+ killer T-cells) were the most abundant. Which, as the authors point out, is rather odd for autoimmune hepatitis - typically associated with higher B-cells and Plasma cells (they are of the same lineage). Interestingly, they also observed increased CD8+ T-cells in the blood. Make of that what you will...and the authors discuss it in some detail.

What's driving this T-cell mediated autoimmune destruction of the liver? You guessed it...Spike Protein.


On the one hand, I feel comfort in knowing that my appraisal of this novel product in these rather novel circumstances was relatively level-headed. On the other, I am saddened in knowing that most people will move on with their lives blissfully unaware of that which is making them sick. This seems to be a recurring pattern in many facets of health.

For the keenly interested, here's a link to Part 2 of The Problem with Gene-based Injections.

Trojan Horse | The Problem with Gene-based Injections - Part 2
In Part 1 of The Problem with Gene-based Injections, we discussed the fundamental principles underlying our understanding of cellular immunity.

📬
Free & Paid subscription options available! Paid-subscribers support the process of updating Medicine & spreading the Knowledge.